Keto Mexican Pizza

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This is an amazingly delicious meal that is calorie dense but keto and low carb diet friendly.

I browned ground beef, (I used grass-fed beef, but any meat or meat alternative would I am sure work fine), added a packet of taco seasoning, melted in some chunks of cheese (I used the Aldi version of Velveeta*) and a mostly full jar of medium salsa. I let that all melt together. I made 4 mini pizza crusts with the fathead pizza crust. (I was out of cream cheese and ricotta cheese, so I substituted cottage cheese and it worked just fine) I baked them all with no toppings.

I topped one with the Mexican delightfulness and baked for a few more minutes I was still at 400 degrees from making the crust. I then topped it with a scoop of sour cream.

OMG I had to text a friend about it. YES. It. was. that. good. Self-control was a problem but this food is so rich and dense you cannot physically consume more than one pizza. That being said, I made a second one later in a moment of weakness, so be warned. I should have packed up all the leftovers a little faster in retrospect.

Anyways, I tested my keto levels a few hours later with the keto strips and I was good to go! 🙂

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Enjoy Food Again

Fast food is a problem and perhaps that’s because we are so detached from the cooking, the source, and the enjoyment.

What if we slow it down a little? What if we think in the grocery store, hang out in the produce section, and see what’s new and fresh? What if we think about our next meal and plan it and cook it slowly while we think about the flavors and the ingredients? What if we sit down and savor each bite? What if we bake some cookies from scratch? What will it look like if we change the thought pattern about making food? (Michael Pollan has a documentary called Cooked, and it’s based on his book by the same name.) Here’s a link to view a preview of his Netflix series. He learns how to cook, bake and take time to enjoy the process as he explains the origin of cooking and really examines where we are right now as a food obsessed culture.

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The truth is so glaringly obvious that it’s hard not to see it when it comes to food. Fast food is a problem and perhaps that’s because we are so detached from the cooking, the source, and the enjoyment.  For example, I slam a burrito in the car (my food drug of choice) on the way to wherever I must be getting to and then I don’t feel full or satisfied, but that’s ok because there will be a snack bar, food truck and coffee bar every step of the way I am most likely going. Let’s say anywhere there will be people, even a soccer game that last less than an hour, will be met with food that Madeline’s mom packed in a cooler stuffed with enough to feed the pack for 3 months should a disaster strike the soccer field and leave everyone stranded. And who wants to go out for pizza after the game we just grazed our way through? Don’t worry about being hungry there will be more food at the next place and when I get home I will still be hungry because I haven’t really eaten any actual food all day. So, I open the fridge and look for something, I don’t know what I want, just something that is fast and delicious before I head to bed. It’s silly.

I’m saying it doesn’t have to be this way and of course I am not the first person to rant about it. But one thing leads to another and I am just observing my own habits and seeing that once I slow down and slice some vegetables and cook some meat I feel good about the meal I eat. I like to cook, but I have to stay home to do it and that’s the trick. Staying home for a couple hours and thinking about it, caring about the meal and the process is something that is ancient and instinctual for humans. Perhaps we have backed away from the ritual that made a meal sacred and something very spiritual and essential has been lost. And maybe that is why most meals are not filling the void that we have mindlessly created.

My practice for today will be to search for something sacred in the food I am eating and preparing. I want to enjoy the flavors and savor the moments that I am eating and see if I can get back to my ancestral roots of honoring the source of life that makes the meal possible. I might start saying Grace again, why not be thankful for every meal?